Problem Gambling and Gambling Problems Come in Varying Degrees of Intensity and May Worsen

Problem Gambling and Gambling Problems Come in Varying Degrees of Intensity and May Worsen

Problem gambling, also known as compulsive gambling, is recognized as a disease or sickness. But not all people who have a that problem would be diagnosed as being compulsive gamblers. As with any behavior, the degree or severity of the behavior determines the clinical classification.

Therapists use different scales to assess a gambling behavior and base the therapy according to the assessment. Most therapists use DSM-IV or the South Oaks Gambling Screen for diagnosis.

Just having compulsive or pathological gambling recognized as a treatable disease was a major accomplishment for the therapists who treat those problems. For many years gambling was looked upon as a character flaw or weakness, but not a true disease. Now that it has been accepted that out of control gambling is a disease that may be treated effective methods are emerging.

One point that almost all clinicians agree on is that the best way to effectively treat the problem is to stop the gambling immediately. Some clinical studies have indicated that neuro transmitter deficiencies may be a cause of the problem and drug therapies are being tested while other forms of behavioral therapy, such as support groups and guided mediation or hypnosis are also showing some success.

If you are wondering if you or someone you know has a gambling problem, here is a checklist

that is used by clinicians to assess for pathological gambling …

“As defined by the American Psychiatric Association, pathological gambling is an impulse control disorder that is a chronic and progressive mental illness.

Pathological gambling is now defined as persistent and recurrent maladaptive behavior meeting at least five of the following criteria, as long as these behaviors are not better explained by a manic episode:

1.Preoccupation. The subject has frequent thoughts about gambling experiences, whether past, future, or fantasy.

2. Tolerance. As with drug tolerance, the subject requires larger or more frequent wagers to experience the same “rush”.

3. Withdrawal. Restlessness or irritability associated with attempts to cease or reduce gambling.
4. Escape. The subject gambles to improve mood or escape problems.

5. Chasing. The subject tries to win back gambling losses with more gambling.

6. Lying. The subject tries to hide the extent of his or her gambling by lying to family, friends, or therapists.

7. Stealing in order to feed their gambling addiction.

8. Loss of control. The person has unsuccessfully attempted to reduce gambling.

9. Illegal acts. The person has broken the law in order to obtain gambling money or recover gambling losses. This may include acts of theft, embezzlement, fraud, forgery, or bad checks.

10. Risked significant relationship. The person gambles despite risking or losing a relationship, job, or other significant opportunity.

11. Bailout. The person turns to family, friends, or another third party for financial assistance as a result of gambling. ”

(from wikipedia at Compulsive Gambling Pathological Gambling)

My own experience as a therapist has led me to believe that number 4. on the list hardly
qualifies as a gambling problem or an indication of a gambling problem since most people who
gamble recreationally do gamble to escape and have fun. On the other hand, the list is a good
place to start if you have concerns. Another suggestion is that you sit in on a meeting of
Gambler’s Anonymous and seek professional counseling. The sooner you address a
suspected gambling problem the sooner you can get it under control and stop the progression
of the illness.

Gambling Addiction and Its Behavioral Effects

Gambling addiction is a serious mental health disorder, which can be identified in two ways: a person either a) continuously bet on things using money or objects that hold value even though negative consequences arise as a result, or, b) they cannot stop gambling even if they desired to. People suffering from gambling addiction often display a strong urge to bet on a wide-range of gambling mediums-from sports games to poker, to choosing lottery numbers and throwing dice. And although friends and family members of compulsive gamblers don’t see the symptoms physically, like they often do with alcoholics or drug abusers, the consequences gambling addiction has serious implications on their lives as well as the lives of their friends and families. Not realizing its severity or taking it too lightly can be devastating for the addicted gambler in the long run. Gamblers can reach a point of literally losing everything, from cars, to homes, to businesses, and even respect from those they care about.

It’s well-known that Florida is notorious for providing “the hotspot” for gamblers all over the world, as well as its residents. But how many gamblers actually endure financial problems? A recent survey by the Florida Council on Compulsive Gambling shed light on card playing, reporting that 70% of these people had trouble paying their bills. But here’s the worst part, which is known to be a side-effect of excessive gambling–1 in 3 of these card players admitted to having participated in illicit activities in order to finance their gambling. Playing cards isn’t as harmless as we thought; criminal activity is still a cause for concern.

Gambling addicts are not always obvious about their situation; sometimes they don’t even realize it themselves. They don’t dwell on what has been lost as a result of their destructive activities and behaviors. Instead, compulsive gamblers only focus on the gains, or the supposed investment aspect of the games they play. And unlike drug or alcohol addiction, a person addicted to gambling will not display symptoms such as heavy fatigue, sickness, loss of energy or dizziness; instead, other factors are apparent, such as falling into deep financial trouble, losing quality time with the ones they love, and heightening the chances of entering into drug or alcohol addiction.

It’s difficult to establish who has a gambling problem and who doesn’t. Where is the threshold between social gamblers, and abusive gamblers? Are there any red flags? The answer is yes. Pathological gamblers often display one or more of the following signs: negligent of family get-togethers, acts on criminal behavior in order to acquire more stuff to bet on, would rather gamble then hang out with friends, talk excessively about gambling and winning money, use drugs or alcohol to distract them from wanting to gamble more, become irritated when not gambling, neglect vital responsibilities for gambling time, and lying to family and friends about going out gambling. A combination of these signs should be a red flag when identifying a compulsive gambler. But remember, none of these signs mention the amount of times a person gambles in a period of time. It’s not about “quantity.” A person can gamble every day and it may not affect his life. Also, gambling addiction isn’t OK if you’re wealthy; rich gamblers can still have issues like neglecting their loved ones and other vital responsibilities.

Florida is well-known for its casinos, entertainment arenas and cruise ship gambling. But environmental factors such as these may cause people to be more susceptible to the development of gambling addiction. Gambling addiction isn’t a problem that stands alone-it may lead to criminal behavior, psychological distress and depression, and fuel other more dangerous addictions. As stated earlier, a person may fall into drug or alcohol addiction in order to supplement or replace their gambling behavior. The combination of multiple addictions can be devastating and more difficult to treat; it would be like tangling a web of loose strings and trying to unravel them all at once.

Addiction specialists and counselors use a variety of methods in treating gambling addiction effectively, including: helping the addict understand what drives him or her to gamble, replacing their betting habits with more productive activities, understanding how it affects the people they care about, and finally, strengthening one’s will to live a more productive lifestyle. If you notice warning signs that you or your loved one is suffering from gambling addiction, it is crucial to intervene and find treatment before it is too late. Doctors treat gambling addiction as a serious brain disease, and people suffering from it are also prone to drug addiction. The importance of acquiring immediate treatment can be the difference between losing everything, and saving someone’s life.

Super Casino Gambling – Online and Offline

Land-based casinos and online casino revenues and site releases are growing faster then ever. Even after the dust has settled following the recent American law prohibiting deposits to online gambling companies, large organisations such as Party Gaming, Ladbrokes and VIP Casino club are all increasing their efforts to attract a wider European or global audience.

Gambling itself is a compulsive and addictive activity, with numerous regulatory societies attempting to outlaw and even ban online gambling around the globe. Regulatory environments themselves differ from country to country. While the US has sought keenly to identify ways of banning online gambling, the UK has lead the way to ensuring that online gambling remains a choice for many, but does not become a threat to others.

Its recent release of a new Gambling Act has sought to protect children and problem areas from abusive gambling, while attempting to levy a tax duty on all income from gambling both offline and online. The Act will make it illegal to entice children to gamble and there will be compulsory age checks for online gambling websites.

Its new Gambling Act will provision for the construction of Super Casinos in selected areas across the country, though this has been scaled down from an initial 40 super casinos to around 8, following complaints from the public and opposition parties. The Gambling Act will allow casinos to operate 24 hours, with unlimited jackpots, and gambling will be allowed on Sundays and Bank Holidays. As far as online websites are concerned, when the Act comes into force at the end of September 2007, companies will be able to apply for a license to operate online gambling website from a UK base.

Countries differ in terms of how they levy a tax on gambling. For example, some will tax each bet individually while countries like the UK, tax only the gross profits that gambling organisations make. Territories like Malta and Gibraltar offer competitive tax regimes as well as the benefits of an off-shore financial centre.

Australia has a large gambling population, where statistic show that 80% of its population gambles. Super casinos are also allowed in Australia, with Sydney’s Star City reputedly the size of 7 football fields. A recent study also showed that Australians spend more money each week on gambling than they do on alcohol or clothes. State government proceeds from gambling have increased to around $3.8bn per annum, since 1998.

What of other jurisdictions across the globe?

Below is a list of some countries and some interesting figures relating to gambling.

Australia

80% of population gamble

Legal age to gamble is 18

$80 billion gambling turnover in 2006

States received $3.8 billion in gambling duties 2006

Online gambling is permitted

Sweden

95% of population gamble

Legal age to gamble is 18

58 billion Swedish Crowns turnover in 2006

Government received 5 billion Crowns in tax in 2006

Online gambling is permitted

Spain

70% of population gamble

Legal age is 18

EUR30 billion gambling turnover

Receives EUR1 billion in gambling taxes

Recently allowed online gambling licenses

Macau

60% of population gamble

Legal age is 18

$6 billion in gambling takings 2006

$1 billion state revenues from gambling

Online gambling is permitted

UK

70% of population gamble

Legal age to gamble is 18 (though lotteries and pools and low stake machine permit 16)

£53 billion gambling expenditure in 2006

UK received £1.3 billion in gambling duties in 2006

Online gambling permitted

US

80% of population gamble

Legal age 18 (most casinos age 21 as this is legal alcohol age associated with casinos)

$82 billion gambling expenditure 2006

States received over $8 billion in gambling revenues 2006